FRIDAY FEATURED WORKSHOP- APA

“Counseling with Choice Theory: The New Reality Therapy”

 

Featured Presenter:                William Glasser, M.D.

Dr. Glasser worked in the private practice of psychiatry in West Los Angeles from 1956-86, while lecturing and writing on a concurrent basis.  Since closing his office, he has devoted himself completely to writing, lecturing and intensively training people in his ideas.  He has worked and consulted in every area of psychiatry and has taught and lectured at universities in many countries of the world.  He is presently an adjunct professor of counseling at California State University, Northridge.  He is president of the William Glasser Institute in Chatsworth, California, an international organization consisting of over 50,000 people who have received training in Choice Theory, Reality Therapy, Quality Education and Choice Theory Management all over the world.

 

Date:                                       Friday, August 22, 2003

Time                                       9:00am to 12:00pm

Break for Lunch

continued 1:30pm to 4:30pm

Room:                                     Texas Ballroom A                           

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                             PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED  -$50.00 fee (limited seating) 

CE Credit:                              5.5 hours

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, ASWB, CABS

Target Audience:                 Open

 

                Dr. Glasser will begin his workshop by explaining Choice Theory, which describes that humans choose their behaviors and that the purpose of counseling is to help clients make better choices so they can improve their mental health.  Counseling with Choice Theory is more effective than traditional counseling approaches and also shortens the time needed for counseling.  Teaching Choice Theory to clients has become an integral part of the new Reality Therapy. Once clients have learned Choice Theory, they can continue using it to improve their mental health even after they leave counseling.

                Dr. Glasser explains that unhappiness is the cause of clients’ symptoms, and that the cause of their unhappiness is unsatisfying relationships.  The unhappy clients are not mentally ill (i.e. there is nothing wrong with their brains that would preclude counseling) and the DSM-IV is an accurate description of all ways unhappy people choose to behave.  Though Dr. Glasser is a psychiatrist and can prescribe brain drugs, he never has in all the years he has been in successful counseling practice.  Find out at this workshop how to counsel anyone with a DSM-IV diagnosis, including the symptoms called schizophrenia, without prescribing drugs.

               

At the end of this workshop, participants should be able to:

1.        Discuss with clients that they are unhappy because they are not getting along with an important person in their present life to the extent they want, usually a marital partner, a child, a parent, a teacher and/or a boss. Also they may be unable to get along with well with anyone in their present lives.

  1. Discuss with clients that their symptoms are the variety of ways that they have chosen to deal with their unhappiness because following Choice Theory we all choose all that we do.
  2. Identify that all behavior is called total behavior because it is made up of four completely connected but individually separate components: Acting, thinking, feeling and physiology. Two of the four components, acting and thinking are directly chosen, the other two, feeling and physiology are indirectly chosen depending on what the client chose to act and think. Therefore, therapy focuses on acting and thinking, as these are the components we can control. In therapy clients learn to make more need-satisfying choices and when they do, they become happy or mentally healthier than when they started.
  3. Describe the premise for the therapists to focus on the behaviors the clients are presently choosing as the client attempts to improve their present relationships because all any of us can control is what is going on in our present lives.
  4. Describe the premise for the therapists to focus on the symptoms and try to lead clients away from their symptoms because the symptoms are the result of the unhappiness that must be corrected and this correction is the core of the therapy.
  5. Describe that the key part of the therapy is to teach clients how to be happier or mentally healthier than they are.

 

FRIDAY CONCURRENT PRESENTATIONS- APA

 

 

Guided Imagery as a Healing, Therapeutic Tool”

 

Presenter:                      Charles D. Leviton, Ed.D., DAPA

                                        Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

                                        Licensed Psychotherapist

                                        Synergy Seminars

               

                                        Patti Leviton, MA, Cht

                                        Certified Hypnotherapist

                                        Synergy Seminars

 

Date:                               Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                              8:00am to 12:00pm (with 15 minute break)

Room:                             Executive Salon 3

Level:                             All levels

Fee:                                 No additional fee

CE Credit:                      3.75 hours

CE Approval:                APA, NBCC, ASWB, CABS, RN

Target Audience:         Open

 

        Guided Imagery stands at the cutting edge of today’s psychotherapy as people become more and more attuned to the “mind-body” connection.  Imagery has become the treatment of choice for stress reduction, pain control, symptom removal, prior trauma removal and personal growth.  Participants will benefit from the experience of imagery, plus understand how to utilize this process themselves with clients as an additional tool for diagnosis, stress reduction, healing, and therapeutic growth.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1.        Listen to one’s body and relax into the physical or emotional pain, as opposed to judging the experience or fighting and denying it.

2.        Utilize the healing properties of the body; “the healing solution”, the body’s own placebo.

3.        Talk to the pain in symbolic imagery; ask the symptom to take symbolic form and carry on dialogue at to its function and purpose.

4.        Begin to bring the “mind body” connection into focus and “give the body permission to heal.”

 

 

 

Healing the Therapeutic Community: Hope for Re-Integrating the Work of Medicine, Psychotherapy, and Pastoral Care”

 

Presenters:            Barbara D. Henderson, D.Min., BCC, LPC, DAPA

                                Chaplain/Pastoral Counselor

       Los Alamos Medical Center, Los Alamos NM

                               

                                Elliot J. Rapoport, Ph.D.

                                Clinical Psychologist, Private Practice in Santa Fe NM

 

                                Robert J. Thomsen, M.D.

                                Dermatologist, Private Practice in Los Alamos NM

                                Los Alamos Medical Center, Los Alamos NM

 

Date:                       Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                      8:00am to 10:00am

Room:                     Executive Salon 1

Level:                     Introductory

Fee:                         No additional fee

CE Credit:              2.0 hours

CE Approval:        APA, NBCC, ASWB, CABS, RN

Target Audience:                Physicians, Psychologists, Psychotherapists, Clergy and Pastoral Counselors, Social Workers, Nurses

 

        In the past two decades there has been significant research associating religious and spiritual values with client healing.  It is now understood that the clinician who discounts or ignores the spirituality of the clients serves the client poorly and undermines the healing process.  Less well understood and appreciated is the role the clinician’s own spirituality plays in the client-provider relationship.  Since the foundation for healing lies in the transforming nature of the relationship between client and provider, and requires trust and accountability on both parts, it is incumbent upon the clinician to become clear about his/her own spiritual values and practices and to develop them to the fullest.  It is also wise for the clinician to become informed about the religion/spiritual practices of his/her clients.

        Physical, psychological, and spiritual care has not always been separate in theory or in practice.  The recent tendency toward evidence-based scientific medicine has accentuated the gap that has been created between the therapeutic disciplines, and the rise of specialization, works against the best possible outcome for the client.  It is the thesis of this presentation that closer integration of spiritual values and pastoral care into the practice of both medicine and psychotherapy will promote greater health for client and provider alike and may lead to lessening the split between medicine, psychotherapy and pastoral care.

        This interactive presentation will invite the participant to consider the further development of his/her own spirituality, consider the ways in which spirituality is integrated into his/her life and practice, and explore ways to foster the re-integration of medicine, psychotherapy, and pastoral care within his/her own practice setting.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand the roots of the historic split between medicine, psychotherapy, and pastoral care.
  2. Understand and describe how religious/spiritual values and practices promote healing.
  3. Explore options for deepening one’s own spirituality.
  4. Describe the current efforts toward re-integration of the therapeutic disciplines.
  5. Explore options for more closely aligning each of the therapeutic disciplines within his/her own practice.

 

 

 

Emotional Abuse: Admitting What We Don’t Know, Codifying What We Do”

 

Presenter:                      SaraKay Smullens, MSW, LCSW, BCD, DAPA

                                       

Date:                               Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                              10:15am to 12:15pm

Room:                             Executive Salon 1

Level:                             Introductory and Intermediate

Fee:                                 No additional fee

CE Credit:                      2.0 hours

CE Approvals:              APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS

Target Audience:         Open

 

 

        Emotional abuse is the overlooked member of the trio of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse.  Since emotional abuse doesn’t grab the headlines, service providers may believe they have an instinctive grasp of its legacy of intergenerational victimization and impairment of intellectual and emotional growth.  Yet many marriage and family therapists lack the theoretical structure to link symptom manifestations to specific types of emotional abuse or the comprehensive spectrum that subsumes these types of emotional abuse.  The first step toward treatment is the identification of one or more of the five cycles of parental or caregiver behavior that constitutes emotional abuse (rage, enmeshment, extreme overprotection, rage/abandonment, and complete neglect).  Through a close evaluation of what individual clients present, some surprising connections about emotional abuse can be revealed; due to it’s ever-expanding nature, emotional abuse that begins in childhood.  In a different way, each cycle entraps its victim in replicative or reactionary relationships with family members, friends, teachers, employers, professional colleagues, and partners.  Yet, within the brutality and apparent hopelessness of each cycle of emotional abuse lie the seeds of regeneration and wholeness.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1.        Renew the sense of power and pervasiveness of emotional abuse and its deleterious effect on the lives of their clients.

2.        Clearly identify the five cycles of emotional abuse as well as be prepared to handle the interplay between cycles.

3.        Understand the power of entrapment and malignancy present within these cycles.

4.        Understand a treatment process (broken down by cycle) that engages families in a path to recovery and use of fuller potential and holds them responsible for their success.

 

 

 

Integrated Health Advocacy Programsm: A Holistic Approach to Multiple Chronic Disease Management”

 

Presenter:                              Maria Kuhn, M.A., M.S., N.C.C., D.A.P.A.

                                                Counselor, Private Practice

                                                Partner in Benefit Performance Associates, LLC

 

                                                Karen Curtin R.N., B.S., C.C.M., C.D.M.S.

                                                Focus in Rehabilitation and Disability Management                                        

 

                                                Christina Krause Ph.D.

                                                Research Director of the Integrated Health Advocacy Program

                                                Assistant Professor at Aurora University                                            

 

                                                Stephan Joyce M.D., M.P.H.

                                                Medical Director of Sherman Health System’s employee benefit plan

                                                Board Certified in Occupational Medicine

 

Date:                                       Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                      1:30pm to 3:30pm (includes 15 minute break)

Room:                                     Executive Salon 3

Level:                                     All Levels

Fee:                                         No additional charge

CE Credit:                              2 hours

CE Approval:                                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, CABS, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

                The Integrated Health Advocacy Programsm (IHAPsm) is one that supports an integrated, holistic approach to the management of multiple chronic health problems.  This multi-disciplinary team consisting of a Primary Advocate (a nurse and/or case manager), Medical Advocate (a physician), and a Psycho-Social Advocate (a psychologist and/or counselor) who collaborate with participants to improve their health and health-related outcomes.  This program is unique because it addresses the medical, psychological, social, spiritual and economic issues associated with co-morbid chronic health issues of these individuals.  Often participants have previously suffered from a fragmented health care system, which leaves the providers frustrated because of their inability to collaborate with other pertinent healthcare providers.  Furthermore, this fragmented system frequently escalates the costs for medical care.  These drawbacks result in this group of individuals experiencing hopelessness and powerlessness, which leads to poor decisions being made in regards to their healthcare needs.  Research conducted with this group, who were involved in the IHAP, resulted in gradual increases in personal control over their health, as well as having positive psychological and behavioral outcomes.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand what is meant by a truly integrated whole-person approach to multiple chronic disease management.
  2. Identify the advantages of utilizing a collaborative team approach in the process and outcomes of healthcare management.
  3. Appraise the unique relationship between the Advocates, the providers and the participants within the program.
  4. Comprehend the importance of partnering with participants to encourage personal responsibility in achieving and sustaining their optimal level of health.
  5. Assess the increases in participants’ self-efficacy resulting from their involvement in the Integrated Health Advocacy Programsm.

 

Talking to Your Client’s Eyes-Not Just Their Ears!”

 

Presenter:                                              Danie Beaulieu, Ph.D.

                                                                Psychologist, International Therapy Trainer, Author

                                                                Academie Impact, Quebec City, Canada

 

Date:                                                      Friday, August 22, 2003                 

Time:                                                      1:30pm to 4:45pm (includes 15 minute break)

Room:                                                    Executive Salon 1

Level:                                                     All Levels

Fee:                                                        No additional fee

CE Credits:                                            3 hours

CE Approval:                                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, CABS

Target Audience:                                 Open

 

                Did you know that sixty percent of all information gathered to the brain comes via the eyes?  Surprisingly however, most therapies focus on ears – and words.  Have you ever felt that while you were talking to your clients they were actually recording their own inner talk rather than your words?  When we speak to the eyes, we don’t get that kind of distortion and interference.

                Impact Therapy, developed by Dr. Ed Jacobs of West Virginia University, lets the therapist recruit all the client’s senses into the process of overcoming difficulties, problem-solving and personal growth.  Rather than relying on an often-futile exchange of words, Impact goes to the multisensory heart of the matter, circumventing the rhetorical and cognitive defenses that so often block progress.  Impact stimulates new thoughts and realizations with concrete representations and visual metaphors, facilitating novel solutions to formerly intractable problems.

                This presentation will present many different ways to bypass the client’s resistances and to trigger their other powerful learning systems.  Participants will discover numerous new creative tools to address a wide range of psychological problems.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. List three different ways to address implicit memory.
  2. Describe five visual techniques to use with clients.
  3. Describe five kinesthetic techniques to use with clients.
  4. Develop five new multisensory tools to use with clients.

 

 

Self Adjusting and Self Actualizing Psychotherapy (SASAP): A Time Limited Approach to Therapy”

 

Presenter:                              Carmen G. Nate, M.D., DAPA

Chair Emeritus, Department of Psychiatry, Brotman Hospital in Culver City, CA; Daniel Freeman Hospital in Marina Del Rey, CA; St Francis Medical Center in Lynwood, CA

 

Date:                                       Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                      4:00pm to 5:00pm

Room:                                     Executive Salon 3

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1 hour

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, CABS, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

                Given the present time we live in, the age of HMO’s and managed health care and the unwillingness of insurance companies to pay for open-ended dynamic psychotherapy, we must develop a paradigm in order to provide an effective psychotherapy in the light of the present political and economic realities.

                Here we are setting forth a new approach to psychotherapy what is holistic, focused, and synthesized; a more comprehensive approach to understanding human beings.  This structured time limited approach to therapy is called, “Self Adjusting and Self Actualizing Psychotherapy” (SASAP).  It is derived from a theory known as Creative Human Process theory set forth by Fred Weaver, III M.D., which won him a parchment and medal at the 7th World Congress of Social Psychiatry in October 1978 in Lisbon, Portugal.

                SASAP is an expanded form of psychotherapy utilizing a particular aspect of creative process manifested in each developmental stage and psychological levels.  In moving up the evolutionary spiral of human creative process, it seems that at the higher level of human development there is a time-space relatedness of dance, music, art, drama, games, poetry and spirituality-the epitome of human beingness.

                This approach synthesizes Science and Spirituality processes (a synthesis of love and truth) in the human experience translated into human action to balance the actualizing self and the adjusting self.  The process is designed to assist the individual to test the limits of the internal and external “reality” from within self or form the outside self.  The goal is to complete ones identity and move toward a perspective of developing a paradigm that explores the infinite, accepts detachment and glows with impermanence at which they are compatible intraphysically and environmentally.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe an integrating tool for all the various forms of Psychotherapy towards wholeness and wellness.
  2. Utilize a time-limited technique based on the Creative Human process as a tool towards understanding, prevention and treatment of mental disorders.
  3. Assist clients to discover self to be conscious of ones own uniqueness so he/she can learn to be who he/she is.
  4. Expand your creative power in the pursuit of your personal and professional goals.

 

 

 

 

FRIDAY CONCURRENT SESSIONS – AAIM

 

Medical Education in Complementary and Alternative Medicine: The Alexian Brothers Hospital Network Experience”

 

Presenter:                              Patrick B. Massey, M.D., Ph.D.

                                                Medical Director, Complementary and Alternative Medicine

                                                Alexian Brothers Hospital Network

 

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                8:00 am to 9:00 am

Room:                                Executive Salon 2

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credits:                            1.0 hour 

CE Approval:                        RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

As a rule, the success of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) clinics and acceptance of CAM therapies in traditional medicine has been slow.  Resistance to new approaches is often the result of misinformation as well as a lack of credible information.  The foundation of acceptance of CAM lies in the education of physicians, nurses and medical staff.  This is a continuous process that requires a serious commitment by administration and CAM physicians.  This commitment has been achieved at the Alexian Brothers Hospital Network (ABHN).  ABHN is comprised of three hospitals in the western suburbs of Chicago.  These are the Alexian Brothers Medical Center, St. Alexius Hospital and the Alexian Brothers Behavioral Health Hospital. 

ABHN recognized several facts concerning CAM: the medical community is poorly educated on CAM because the information on CAM is vast and physicians do not have the time to research it; patients will continue to use CAM, regardless of their physician’s opinion; Over a 5 year period, there has been a 90% increase in ABHN staff physicians claiming to use CAM therapies (5 physicians in 1998 vs. 45 physicians in 2002)…CAM is already becoming incorporated into traditional medicine.

CAM therapies are, generally safe, however, it is important that the community look to the traditional medical system as an authority on health and medicine.  To accomplish this goal, the medical community must be familiar with CAM. 

An extensive medical education program was initiated and is unique in several aspects: a committed series of lectures (12) on diverse CAM topics; lectures are clinically focused; lecturers are non-local physicians (MD, DO) who are experts in CAM, and use CAM therapies in their clinical practice.

This approach has been well accepted by physicians and nurses, facilitating informed discussion of CAM therapies as well as their incorporation into existing medical programs              

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1.        Comprehend and become familiar with CAM.

2.        Recognize the several facets concerning CAM.

3.        Understand the importance that CAM has on the medical community.

 

 

 

An Integrative Approach to Menopause”

 

Presenter:                              Cathy L. Bartels, Pharm.D., FAAIM

                                                Associate Professor and Director of Drug Information Service

                                                School of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences

                                                University of Montana-Missoula

 

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                8:00 am to 9:00 am

Room:                                Executive Salon 4

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour

CE Approval:                        RN

Target Audience:                 Health care providers

 

More and more women are seeking alternatives to standard hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for the management of perimenopausal symptoms and the prevention of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.  Results from the HERS (Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study) trial, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) in 1998, indicate that HRT should not be initiated or continued for primary prevention of coronary heart disease.  The American Heart Association has also published a statement in July of 2001 advising physicians not to prescribe HRT for the sole purpose of preventing heart attacks and stroke.  An article published in JAMA 2002 assessing the risks and benefits associated with HRT utilizing PremproÒ in the Women’s Health Initiative trial provided considerable weight to the link of increased breast cancer with HRT as compared to placebo. The main clinical implication of these studies is the importance of critically weighing the increased risks of coronary heart disease, breast cancer, stroke, and pulmonary embolism over the benefits for bone fractures and colorectal cancer with the use of HRT in each individual woman.  Prescribers are increasingly seeking alternative treatment options for osteoporosis and perimenopausal symptoms.

The primary goal of this presentation is to provide health care practitioners with a review of both the scientific literature and the best anecdotal evidence for the use of integrative and complementary therapies for the treatment of menopausal symptoms, with an emphasis on dietary supplements and natural hormone replacement.  The role of phytoestrogens as an option for hormone replacement therapy will be discussed.  Integrative therapies for the prevention of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease will also be reviewed.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Explain the role of phytoestrogens and natural hormone replacement therapy in the management of menopausal symptoms.
  2. Describe the use of bio-identical estrogen replacement therapy in menopause.
  3. Compare and contrast options for micronized progesterone replacement.
  4. Outline integrative treatment strategies for the prevention of heart disease and osteoporosis in menopausal women.

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation of Integrative Health Programs: Administrator and Practitioner Perspectives”

 

Presenter:                              Carolyn K. Egbert, M.S.

                               

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                9:15 am to 10:15 am

Room:                                Executive Salon 2

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, AGD

Target Audience:                 All integrative medicine disciplines

 

This presentation will present results from a pilot study evaluation of seven integrative health programs located throughout the United States. This research involved quantitative and qualitative assessments of job satisfaction, perceived professional effectiveness, as well as advantages, disadvantages, and suggestions for improvement within integrative health programs among administrators and practitioners. Findings from this study revealed many insights into the current state of integrative health and medical practice. These included useful suggestions for addressing financial, educational, management, interdisciplinary communication, and client issues in order to improve programs that integrate various health and medical services. Interpretations of the findings will be discussed as suggestive for increasing the incorporation of health promotion/disease prevention services into integrative health programs.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1.        Compare and contrast theoretical and practical aspects of integrative health and medicine.

2.        Consider the relevance of job satisfaction, perceived professional effectiveness, and qualitative measures to the evaluation of integrative health programs.

3.        List advantages, disadvantages, and suggestions for improvement within integrative health programs as identified by integrative health professionals.

4.        Appreciate and address the need to continually evaluate and improve integrative health programs to ensure effectiveness and quality health service.

5.        Develop action steps for making an individual and/or collective contribution to improving integrative health and medicine.

 

      

 

 

“Nutritional Supplements are not all created equal: What you should know when making recommendations”

 

Presenter:                              Ron Carsten, DVM, MS, FAAIM

                                                Scientific Director for the Institute of Naturopathic Veterinary Medicine

                                                Owner of Birch Tree Animal Hospital

                                                Consultant and Formulator for Standard Process, Inc.

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                9:15 am to 10:15 am

Room:                                Executive Salon 4

                               

 

 

Level:                                     Introductory

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credits:                            TBA (tentative 1.0 hour)

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

                This presentation will focus on fundamental differences between food based nutritional supplements and synthetic and isolated vitamins.   Early nutritional research investigated foods as a method of delivering key factors for their therapeutic effects.  It was clear at that time that certain foods could be used to treat specific conditions.  Research progressed to isolating and chemically synthesizing these key food based factors and then studying their therapeutic effects.  These historical events have clouded the clear recognition of the inherent differences in food-based nutrition and synthetic and isolated vitamins.  Food based vitamins are a combination of cofactors, enzymes, coenzymes, and trace minerals in a protein matrix.  Additionally, food factors are present in synergistic combinations that appear to enhance their effectiveness.  This contrast with the synthetic vitamin which is not always an exact copy of the original food based vitamin and certainly lacks the important cofactors.  With the variation in chemical structure and lack of cofactors and synergistic components, the physiologic impact of synthetic vitamins is often less than expected.  There are a number of reasons for this in addition to the above.  With this background, the clinician can better understand published nutritional research and decipher the sometimes-conflicting research results, more effectively advise patients, and develop more efficient therapeutic plans

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand fundamental differences in vitamin products.
  2. Recognize differences in food based nutrition and synthetic or isolated vitamins.
  3. Understand the basic intended and unintended impacts of nutritional supplements.
  4. Learn talking points for client communication.
  5. Gain insight into how to interpret conflicting nutritional research result.

 

 

Integrating Alternative Medicine Practices into Traditional Medicine Health Systems”

 

Presenter:                              Susan Blackard, R.N., MHA

Vice-President Hammonds Heart Institute

 

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                10:30 am to 11:30 am

Room:                                Executive Salon 2

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, RN, AGD

Target Audience:                 Open

 

The primary value of INTEGRATING alternative medicine practices into traditional medicine in a 700-bed hospital and health system will be shared with the group.  We will share the hows and why’s behind each step to be successful.  The primary tool by which this is achieved is education:  of management, physicians, and employees.  Thus, an effective 9-step approach to integrating alternative medicine into traditional medicine was developed. 

Defining your core business. The core business of an alternative health practice is not defined by the list of services that the clinic provides.  Rather, it is defined by the value that the practice has for the purchasers of those services and the patients it serves.  We must show that what we have integrated does no harm.

Educating management.  Individuals in company management often lack expertise in health.  The alternative health practitioner is therefore relied upon to provide insight, knowledge and ideas that assist management in promoting personal health.  A variety of management education techniques can be effective, but must be adaptable to individual hospitals and situations.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Define their core business.
  2. Identify a variety of management education techniques.
  3. Identify the effective 9-step approach to integrating alternative medicine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magnetism: How it Affects Longevity”

 

Presenter:                              Dean Bonlie, D.D.S

President, North American Academy of Magnetic Therapy

                                President, Magnetico Inc.    

 

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                10:30 am to 11:30 am

Room:                                Executive Salon 4

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS, AGD

Target Audience:                 Open

 

                Hear and see magnetism from a totally new perspective- a depleted essential environmental factor that affects the function of every atom of your body!!

                The introduction will present evidence of detrimental effects to life forms due to the dramatic depletion of geomagnetic field available on the planet.  Methods of determining the amount of reduction are given, current and past measurements, and rate of present continuing decline…including an estimation of point zero by NASA.

                There is an increasing interest in the “energy’ medicine field in relation to wellness and anti-aging.  It takes energy to make chemistry happen.  This presentation is only scratching the surface of an incredibly fascinating subject.  Hopefully, it will provide you with an elementary scientific foundation on which to build your knowledge and skills.  Research in Physics and Chemistry is confirming these basics.  There is no doubt that this is an emerging science.

                When used in harmony with the principles of natural magnetism is not only completely safe, but has tremendous potential for assisting in body recovery and regeneration.  There is never a total magic solution, but magnetic energy is close, being synergistic with all other treatments by supplementing the body’s own energy, which is the key to body function or repair.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Define the basic need for environmental magnetism.
  2. Have a clear understanding of the ‘Uni-polar, Uni-directional Magnetic Field Theory’ needed to explain effects on life on this planet.
  3. Explain bi-polar magnetic field applications, treatment implications, and longevity of results.
  4. Explain difference of action between Uni-polar whole-body restorations and chronic or acute body areas needing localized treatment.
  5. Provide evidence of efficacy of magnetic therapy in various studies.
  6. Summarize the potential of ‘energy medicine’ of the future and it’s synergism with other wellness and anti-aging protocols, both preventive and proactive.

 

 

 

“Integrating Clinical Trials into Treatment Programs”

 

Presenter:                              Gilbert Kaats, Ph.D.

                                                Health and Medical Research Foundation

                                               

                                Samuel C. Keith

                                                Health and Medical Research Foundation

                                               

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                1:00 pm to 2:30 pm

Room:                                     Executive Salon 2

Level:                                     Intermediate

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit                               1.5 hours     

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, RN, CABS

Target Audience:                 Open

 

         In spite of the health risks, personal discomfort, financial expenditures, and personal efforts on the part of dieters, people throughout the world have continued to gain weight to a point where overweight and obesity have become a global epidemic. It is estimated that almost 10% of the nation’s current healthcare budget is expended on obesity-related disorders.  The consequences of obesity have been underscored by recent studies suggesting that obesity at age 40 can decrease the patient’s lifespan by 3 years and obesity at age 20 can reduce lifespans by 20 years.  While a plethora of weight loss products and diets have been marketed to dieters, none have been effective enough to reverse this weight gain.  Some of this failure appears to be attributable to difficulties in selecting and conducting safe and efficacious weight treatment plans. This presentation reviews published and unpublished weight loss studies that illustrate specific challenges confronting healthcare providers in the treatment of weight problems and obesity.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the magnitude of the obesity problem.
  2. Describe fallacies of using scale weight and/or BMI as a treatment outcome measures.
  3. Provide supplements and behavior modification modules to preserve bone mass during dieting.
  4. Describe the difficulties of using placebo protocols to evaluate the safety and efficacy of weight loss programs and products.
  5. Describe the difficulties of incorporating exercise programs into weight loss treatment plans.

 

 

 

Natural Antiviral Compounds for the Prevention and Treatment of Viral Diseases: An Integrative Medicine Model”

 

Presenter:                              James E. Williams, O.M.D.

                                                Doctor of Oriental Medicine

                                                Board Certified Naturopathic Physician

                                                Licensed Acupuncturist (California)

                                                Acupuncture Physician (Florida)

 

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                1:00 pm to 2:30 pm

Room:                                Executive Salon 4

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.5 hours                     

CE Approval:                        APA, RN

Target Audience:                 Physicians, CAM Providers, Nurses

 

Infectious diseases are the third leading cause of death in the world, and virologists agree that a global influenza pandemic is imminent in the near future. The last major flu pandemic, the Spanish Flu of 1918, killed 40 million people. In 1997, a mutation of an avian influenza virus in Hong Kong killed 6 of the 18 people infected: a thirty percent death rate, which is comparable or greater than smallpox. But even at a one percent death rate, 60 million people could die worldwide in less than a year. In addition, newly emerging viruses like Hanta and Ebola viruses, chronic viruses like HIV and HCV, and cases of activated latent viral illnesses such as EBV, CMV, and HHV-6 are increasing at an alarming rate. Viruses are multiplying too quickly for Western medicine to keep up, therefore while modern medicine strives for new vaccines and effective antiviral drugs, physicians and health care providers should be aware of natural antiviral alternatives and how to implement their use in the clinical practice. This lecture discusses the characteristics and architecture of viruses that make them so difficult to eradicate; reviews viral pathogenesis and immune response to viral infection including both innate, adaptive, and cellular responses; reviews natural antiviral compounds; and presents safe and effective therapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of viral illnesses.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Learn what viruses are, how viral pathogenesis occurs, how the immune system responds to viral infection, the evolutionary role of viruses, and why viruses are so difficult to eradicate.
  2. Improve their understanding of how to diagnose and treat viral infections.
  3. Expand their knowledge of natural antiviral compounds, and review the basic science and evidence-based research behind them.
  4. Master clinical strategies and learn treatment protocols using an integrative model for the diagnosis and treatment of viral illnesses.
  5. Prepare for the increasing incidence of viral disease and impending bio-terrorism.

 

 

Faith Based Temperament Therapy”

 

Presenter:                              Rev. Mario Garcia, J.D., C.A.P.P., L.C.P.C.

                                                Founder and President, Leadership & Pastoral Counseling Institute

                                                Principal, Garcia Law Offices, P.A.

 

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                1:00 pm to 5:00 pm, with a 30 minute break

Room:                                Texas Ballroom C

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              3.5 hours

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS

Target Audience:                 Open

 

This presentation will provide the learner with the biblical, historic and scientific background of the theory of temperament, faith based therapy model; the general behavior patterns of each temperament; and an introduction to the Arno Profile System and its uses. 

The purpose of this presentation is to teach the participant the general behavior patterns of each temperament, how it affects every aspect of our lives, and how to use this information to assist the counselee.  The participant will be introduced to a test called “Arno Profile System”, a temperament analysis profile instrument.  Unlike other measurements of behavior, it measures inborn temperament with 95.7% accuracy. This presentation will also provide the participant with a credible alternative to the counseling techniques currently available to the faith-based community.  The therapeutic model taught in this presentation has a proven success rate of 93.4%.  This percentile is based on therapy conducted with over 7,000 counselees. This presentation will also teach the participant how to counsel others and how to assist their counselees in achieving long-term emotional and spiritual being from a faith based perspective.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

                1. Identify general behavior patterns of each temperament.

                2. Describe the Arno Profile System.

                3. Utilize credible alternatives to current counseling techniques available in the faith-based community.

               

 

Molecular Mechanisms of Weight Management by a Novel, Natural Extract of (-) –hydroxycitric acid”

 

Presenter:                              Debasis Bagchi, Ph.D., FACN, CNS, MAIChE

Professor, Dept. of Pharmacy Sciences

Creighton University Medical Center

 

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                3:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Room:                                Executive Salon 2

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS            

Target Audience:                 open

 

Garcinia cambogia-derived (-)-hydroxycitric acid has been reported to cause appetite suppression and weight loss. A novel, calcium-potassium, water-soluble salt (HCA-SX, Super CitriMaxâ) was used in our study. A broad spectrum of safety studies has demonstrated the relative safety of the product. A dose response study was conducted to demonstrate the release/availability of 5-HT (serotonin) in rat brain cortical slices following incubation with varying concentrations of HCA-SX. The bioavailability of HCA-SX was determined in human volunteers with food and in a fasting state. A human clinical study was conducted in forty-five human subjects for eight weeks to demonstrate the efficacy of HCA-SX (2,800 mg HCA/day for eight wk) in reducing body weight, body mass index (BMI), appetite, LDL, HDL, VLDL, triglycerides, total cholesterol, serum leptin levels, serum serotonin levels, and excretion of urinary fat metabolites. We also evaluated the efficacy of HCA-SX supplementation in obese Zucker Fatty Rats (ZFR) for a period of six weeks.

Results demonstrate that HCA-SX can serve as a mild serotonin receptor reuptake inhibitor (SRRIs) and increase the availability of 5-HT. In the bioavailability study, it was demonstrated that Super CitriMax is more bioavailable in a fasting state as compared to when taken with food. The HCA-SX supplemented group demonstrated a decrease in body weight, BMI, appetite, LDL, VLDL, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and serum leptin levels, while an increase was observed in HDL levels, serotonin levels and excretion of urinary fat metabolites. The effect of HCA-SX supplementation in aged, obese ZFR for six weeks significantly improved the components of metabolic syndrome including, systolic blood pressure (SBP), kidney and hepatic lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that Super CitriMax is a safe and efficacious natural product for weight management with no adverse effects.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

                1. Answer if obesity is an epidemic in the United States.

                2. Relate an overview on metabolism and obesity regulatory genes.

                3. Identify key factors in weight management.

                4. Relate an overview on the natural products used in weight management: Basic Mechanism of Action.

                5. Discuss the clinical finding of a Novel (-)-hydroxycitric acid in regulating obesity: Intricate Mechanistic Issues.

 

 

 

 

 

Integrative Care in Injury Cases”

 

Presenter:                              Lorrie Saunders

                Medical Services Director

                Medical Financial Services of Anchorage Alaska

 

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                3:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Room:                                Executive Salon 4

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour

CE Approvals:                      APA, RN, AGD

Target Audience:                 clinical staff, administrative staff

 

Nowhere in today’s modern medicines is it more important to use the Integrative Care philosophy than in injury cases. With today’s specialized medicine and the enormous amount of scientific knowledge now available, the idea of the family doctor doing emergency treatment in injury house calls are long past.  In the last 60 years alone we have seen an unprecedented revolution in the science of medicine.  In virtually all areas from radiology to virology, and surgery to psychiatry, we have seen profound and wonderful advances in medicine.  But coordinating these wonderful advances into the best available treatment for any single injured individual is becoming the responsibility of the integrative care specialist for injury cases.  This specialist recognizes the importance of documenting the complete extent of injuries and utilizing a team of specialized health care professionals to allow his or her patient a more rapid return to their former lifestyles.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

                1. Document ancillary injuries for your patients integrative Plans of Care.

                2. Utilize methods of working concurrently with other health care providers.

                3. Write Letters of Opinion for your injured patients legal cases.

 

 

 

Can Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors be Reduced Following a Short-Term, Integrative Lifestyle Modification Intervention?”

 

Presenter:                              Robert W. Jarski, Ph.D., FAAIM

Director, Complementary Medicine and Wellness Program

Oakland University

 

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                4:15 pm to 5:15 pm

Room:                                Executive Salon 2

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, RN

Target Audience:                 open

 

When the underlying behaviors causing occlusive coronary artery disease are addressed, heart disease can be reversed.  The objective of the pilot study that was conducted was to answer these questions: 1) Can cardiovascular disease risk factors be reduced following a short-term, integrative lifestyle modification intervention? and 2) What factors influence patient’s adherence to a lifestyle modification program?  Ten subjects (7 men, 3 women; average age 58.8 years, S.D.=10.0) participated in a 22-hour weekend retreat program emphasizing the four components of the Lifestyle Heart Trial (Ornish, et al.)  Prior to beginning the study, seven subjects were taking antihypertensive agents and five were taking cholesterol lowering drugs.  Following the retreat, support groups met for 90 minutes each week for three weeks, then monthly.  Subjects were evaluated for the following risk factors prior to the beginning of the program and one year later: weight reduction, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL. total cholesterol-HDL ratio, and triglycerides.  Following the one-year period, subjects were interviewed and asked to identify the major benefits and difficulties adhering to the program.  The present study demonstrated that the risk factors of excess weight, systolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol can be reduced over one year (p<0.05) in subjects participating in a short-term integrative intervention and on-going group support.  No drug dosage was increased, but two subjects decreased their antihypertensives and one decreased their cholesterol lowering agent.  Factors influencing adherence to the program included perceptions of well-being and decreased symptoms. 

 

The presenter will discuss his experiences as a Lifestyle Heart Trial facilitator, and explain the rationale for using the same protocol for reversing cancer.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1. Describe if cardiovascular disease risk factors can be reduced following a short-term, integrative lifestyle modification intervention.

2. Describe what factors influence patient’s adherence to a lifestyle modification program.

 

 

 

Biotouch: Clinical Integration of an Energy Therapy”

 

Presenter:                              Kenna Stephenson, M.D.

Medical Director of Women’s Wellness Center

The University of Texas Health Center

                                Board Certified Family Physician

 

Date:                                Friday, August 22, 2003

Time:                                4:15 pm to 5:15 pm

Room:                                Executive Salon 4

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, RN, AGD

Target Audience:                 open

 

Bio-Magnetic Touch Healing, hereafter referred to as biotouch, relies on the premise that as a therapy it affects the energy fields of the human body. Light touch of designated set points is used to intensify and enhance the flow of energy between the practitioner and the patient. Previous research demonstrates the effectiveness of biotouch in reducing pain and stress. Our Health Center provided training for twenty-eight clinical staff in this technique and they have integrated into some of our 22 clinics and 385-bed hospital. Two pilot projects are currently in progress: “The Effects of Biotouch on Quality of Life Scores in Patients”; “Does Providing Biotouch in Patient Encounters Affect Nursing Satisfaction?” Preliminary data is encouraging on this easily accessible complementary modality. The potential clinical impact of biotouch is substantial given that many patients are limited in their physical functioning and experience significant bodily pain, yet conventional medicine has limited options to assist these patients in improvement in their health status.  A demonstration will be given. 

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1.        Define biotouch.

2.        Appropriately identify potential applications of this modality in the clinical setting.

3.        Facilitate training of their own staff and integrate this modality.

               

 

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SATURDAY CONCURRENT PRESENTATIONS- APA

 

Psychopharmacology for the Psychotherapist”

 

Presenter:                                              William A. Mosier, Ed.D., LMFT, PA-C, DABFM, DABPS, DAPA

                                                                Professor

                                                                Wright State University                                            

 

Date:                                                      Saturday, August 23, 2003                 

Time:                                                      8:00am to 12:00pm (includes 15 minute break)

Room:                                                    Executive Salon 3

Level:                                                     All levels

Fee:                                                        No additional fee

CE Credits:                                            3.75 hours

CE Approval:                                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, CABS, RN

Target Audience:                                 Open                     

 

                When do you refer a client for psychopharmacology?  Who should be referred?  What are the goals of psychopharmacology?  Learn about the relationship between psychotherapy and psychopharmacology, the biological basis of psychopharmacology, how psychoactive medications work, and the indications for using medications as an adjunct to psychotherapy.  Anti-depressants, anti-anxiety agents, mood stabilizers, anti-psychotic agents and cognitive enhancement medications will be reviewed.  The psychopharmacology of drugs of abuse also will be explored.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants would be able to:

  1. Define the goal of psychopharmacology.
  2. Identify the criteria for determining who is an ideal candidate for psychopharmacology.
  3. Describe the relationship between psychotherapy and psychopharmacology.
  4. List factors influencing medication compliance.
  5. Name 10 psychoactive agents that are safe and effective as adjunctive treatment to psychotherapy.

 

 

 

Attachment Disorder and Antisocial Personality in Children and Adults:  Clinical and Social Issues”

 

Presenters:                            Terry M. Levy, Ph.D.

Co-Director

Evergreen Psychotherapy Center

 

Michael Orlans, MA

Co-Director

Evergreen Psychotherapy Center

 

Date:                                       Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                      8:00am to 12:00pm (includes 15 minute break)

Room:                                     Executive Salon 1

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              3.75 hours

CE Approval:                                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, CABS, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

There is a serious and rapidly escalating problem throughout our society.  More and more children are failing to develop secure attachments to loving and protective caregivers, and miss the most important foundation for healthy development.  They are flooding our child welfare and juvenile justice systems with an overwhelming array of problems - emotional, behavioral, social, cognitive, physical and moral – and growing up to perpetuate the cycle with their own children.

                Secure attachment is the deep and enduring connection established between a child and caregiver in the first few years of life.  It profoundly influences every aspect of the human condition.  Compromised and disrupted attachment, a result of abuse and neglect, places children at risk for developing serious problems: lack of self-control, aggression, antisocial attitudes and behaviors, including lack of empathy and remorse.  For example, teenage boys with early attachment difficulties are three times more likely to commit violent crimes.  Attachment disorder can lead to “affectionless psychopath”, and the more violent and heartless character to the crimes being committed by today’s youth.

                This presentation will focus on the theory and practice of Corrective Attachment TherapyTM and Corrective Attachment ParentingTM.  Implications for the child welfare and juvenile systems will be discussed.  Videotapes will highlight psychosocial and clinical issues; handouts will be provided.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify and describe the behavioral, cognitive, emotional, interpersonal, and moral symptoms of attachment disorder.
  2. Define the association between severely compromised attachment and the development of antisocial personality.
  3. Describe and explain the structure of the therapeutic process: Revisit, Revise, Revitalize.
  4. Identify the basic components of Corrective Attachment TherapyTM.
  5. Utilize the facilitative aspects of Corrective Attachment TherapyTM.

 

 

 

SATURDAY FEATURED WORKSHOP- APA

“Integrating Spirituality and Brief Therapy”

 

Featured Presenter:                                Bill O’ Hanlon, M.S.

Bill O’Hanlon is a psychotherapist who was a developer of Solution-Orientation Therapy and a founder of Possibility and Inclusive Therapies.  His clinical work is recognized for it’s collaborative, respectful approach to clients.  He is known for his storytelling, irreverent humor and clear and accessible presentation style.

 

Date:                                                      Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                                      9:00am to 12:00pm

                                                                Break for lunch

                                                                continued 1:30pm to 4:30pm

Room:                                                    Texas Ballroom A

Level:                                                     All levels

Fee:                                                        PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED -$50.00 fee

CE Credits:                                            5.5 hours

CE Approval:                                        APA, NBCC,ASWB, CABS

Target Audience:                                 Open

 

                Brief therapy and spirituality?  Many therapists have been taught that spirituality and therapy shouldn’t be mixed.  Brief therapy has a reputation of being pragmatic, directive and not very deep, much less spiritual.  Bill O’Hanlon will turn these presumptions on their heads and show how spirituality is at the core of the brief therapy approach he has developed. 

                In this presentation, he will offer a conceptual model and demonstrate practical methods for using spiritual resources to help clients elicit their own strengths, solutions and possibilities.  He will detail the spiritual basis for solution-oriented therapy.  Through demonstrations, lecture, videotaped examples and handouts, participants will learn new therapeutic tools and ideas that respectfully work with each client’s sense of spirituality. 

                Ideas for how to bring the therapist’s own sense of spirituality into therapy without imposing specific beliefs and clients will be given.  The workshop will offer practical methods and conceptual model for connecting with spirituality and using spiritual resources and methods in the service of change, even when clients have an aversion to religion or spiritual sensibilities.  With its strengths focus and relatively brief treatment length, this approach is especially appropriate for time- and resource-sensitive therapy settings.

 

At the end of this workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe a clear, practical model for using spirituality in therapy.
  2. Use spirituality in therapy.
  3. Do a rapid spiritual assessment.
  4. Tap into spiritual resources to solve serious and previously intractable problems (even with agnostic difficult or skeptical clients).
  5. Describe an overview and review of research on spirituality, therapy and health.

 

 

 

The White Knight is Talking Backwards: Hypnotherapeutic Interventions for Validating and Responding to the Body’s Language of Symptoms”

 

Presenter:                              Thomas Roberts, LICSW, LMFT

                                                President and Psychotherapist/Hypnotherapist

                                                Interchange Counseling

 

Date:                                       Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                      1:30pm to 4:45pm (includes 15 minute break)

Room:                                     Executive Salon 3

Level:                                     Intermediate

Fee:                                         No Additional Charge

CE Credit:                              3 hours

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, CABS, RN

Target Audience:                 Psychotherapists, Physicians, Chiropractors, Nurses, Physical Therapists, Social workers, Counselors

 

                Our ever-increasing comprehension of the interdependence between mind and body is broadening our view of illness and healing.  Too often the client’s symptom is treated as the problem, and the treatment intervention is focused on ridding the client of their symptom.  The approach offered in this presentation is based upon the postulate that certain experiences, which are interpreted by the body as a stressful threat, become stored in the body’s somatic system and, if not allowed to discharge, will bring about the development of symptoms.  These symptoms can be viewed as the body’s unconscious expression of the impact of the stressful threat; and are often unresponsive to traditional treatment interventions.  If symptoms are the unconscious expression of the body, and hypnotherapy utilizes the language of the unconscious, we, therefore, need to learn to design hypnotic language to communicate directly with the somatic expression of the body.  This presentation will help participants understand: 1) why some conditions do not respond to traditional treatments; 2) the importance of approaching our client’s symptoms as the body’s method of communicating about what is needed for healing; 3) to develop skills to translate the functional and symbolic communication of symptoms, and; 4) to learn how to develop hypnotic interventions which will facilitate physiological symptom release, thereby providing lasting healing and relief. 

                This presentation will include an information/lecture segment followed by clinical demonstration.  Skill building groups will then be utilized to provide an experience where participants will have the opportunity to apply the specific skills learned in the workshop.  Overhead projector will be used along with a detailed handout workbook.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe two ways the body interprets certain experiences as traumatic.
  2. Define the term Significant Experience and explain how it differs from the term Trauma.
  3. Identify three methods of how the client’s Body Posture and Life Story work together to maintain the symptom expression.
  4. Name two ways we can improve how we listen to the functional and symbolic communication of our client’s symptoms.
  5. Explain by two examples the role hypnotic language plays in the symptom release process.

 

 

 

 

Beyond Psychotherapy: The Role and Function of a Mission Statement in Bringing Focus and Meaning to all Aspects of One’s Life”

 

Presenter:                              Patricia Hanes Meyer, LCSW, DAPA

Former Clinical Instructor, Georgetown University Medical School, Department of Psychiatry                                                 Private Practice

 

Date:                                       Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                      1:30pm to 4:45pm (with 15 minute break)

Room:                                     Executive Salon 1

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional charge

CE Credit:                              3 hours

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, CABS, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

An effective course of psychotherapy brings an individual to new levels of self-esteem, clarity, and functional capability.  Yet, the individual may still lack a sense of their own uniqueness and lack-focused meaning in their life journey.

                Using the work of Stephen Covey The Seven Habits of Effective People and First Things First and Laurie Beth Jones The Path, participants will experience a review of self-knowledge necessary to define their own unique gifts and talents and will learn of the enormous inner energy that can be released when a mission can be defined.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Learn and define the characteristics of a mission statement and how it can provide focused structure in your life.

2.        Determine the expectations of your future that came from family during childhood, what the unlived lives of your parents that effected life choices and how these expectations affect the evolution of self.

3.        Discover characteristics of self that have been long forgotten, what passions or interests had been important at a younger age and what you were particularly good at or had enjoyed at a younger age.

4.        Define what you are for and you are against, what aspects of life have the most meaning and reflect the most conviction and what aspects of life is one against that self is willing to act on.

5.        Design a mission statement that can permit self to live a focused, consistent life based upon talents, convictions, and defined contributions, what a completed mission statement would look like and the methodology for living the focused structure on a daily basis.

 

SATURDAY CONCURRENT SESSIONS- AAIM

 

Pain and Behavioral Assessment in Complementary Alternative Medicine”

 

Presenter:                              Richard Ackerman, D.C., DABCO, DAAPM, DABDA, DABFM, DAAETS, DABPS, DAPA,

Board Certified Forensic Traumatologist

                                                Professor, Parker Chiropractic College

 

Date:                                       Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                      8:00 am to 9:00 am

Room:                                     Executive Salon 2

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour 

CE Approval:                        APA, RN, AGD

Target Audience:                 Open

 

                The relationship of pain and behavior is well known in the literature and numerous self-reports as well as clinician-administered instruments have been designed for the purpose of substantiating and measuring this relationship.  The accuracy of these self-report instruments is too often dependent upon the sophistication of the patient; their educational level and whether the instrument is valid, or in other words, does it answer the question that the clinician asks?  Even the 2001, 5th Edition of the Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment by the American Medical Association (AMA) has an entire chapter devoted to pain and behavioral instruments and mandates the use of specific instruments in order to rate pain.  In the integrative setting, clinicians are now being called upon to be specialists as well as generalists (primary care physicians) in practice.  Familiarity with these instruments and their specific items will enable the clinician to determine more effectively what is most effective for the patient.  Which ones can be relied upon as valid and reliable and how does the clinician determine the most appropriate instrument?  How does depression affect the patient’s pain level and how do you screen for this?  Are there any instruments out there that are more effective than asking the patient to rate their pain on a 0-10 scale in which no one knows what 1-9 represents and are there any instruments out there that we might use to evaluate for non-organic symptoms, conscious or unconscious deception or malingering?  The purpose of this lecture is to instruct clinicians in the most effective and appropriate measures in the mental health field as well as in the primary care setting and how to use these instruments to gain the most knowledge of their patients’ conditions and complication factors.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1.        Identify the assessment of pain and behavior and most importantly, which instruments are valid and reliable for their and the patients’ needs.

2.        List and discuss numerous self-report and clinician-administered instruments will be discussed as well as the most current literature and research with regard to evaluating pain and behavior.

3.        Identify an effective screening technique that assists the clinician in making the diagnosis of depression.

 

 

 

Effects of Maitake Mushroom Extracts and Other Natural Products of Insulin-Resistance, Aging, and Age-Related Disorders”

 

Presenter:                              Harry G. Preuss, M.D., MACN, CNS

                                                Professor of Physiology, Medicine and Pathology

Georgetown University Medical Center

                                               

 

Date:                                Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                8:00 am to 9:00 am

Room:                                Executive Salon 4

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour                 

CE Approval:                        RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

A link exists between insulin resistance and many chronic disorders of aging including advancing-age itself. A safer means to prevent or, at least, slow the erosion of insulin sensitivity would provide a novel approach to better health. We assessed the ability of various extracts from maitake mushroom to augment insulin sensitivity.  Accordingly, we examined whether a specific extract (fraction SX), as well as whole Maitake powder, fractions ES and D of Maitake could influence blood pressure (BP), a sensitive marker of insulin resistance, and various pertinent biochemical parameters when given orally to Zucker Fatty rats (ZFR), a model of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. A secondary gain was the ability to ascertain the effects of bitter melon, olive oil, and sesame oil alone and combined with fraction SX to influence BP. We found that fraction SX lowers BP and fasting blood glucose significantly over the 3 to 6 weeks of study. While whole Maitake fraction lowered BP effectively, the influences on fasting blood sugar were not apparent under the conditions of study. In contrast to fraction SX, fraction D, developed primarily to enhance immunity and suppress tumor development and growth, has essentially no effect on BP under the conditions examined. An ether soluble fraction designated ES lowers BP significantly. Interestingly, olive oil, unlike sesame oil, also lowers BP. Finally, bitter melon and niacin-bound chromium (NBC) alone and combined with SX also lower BP. We also examined mature, diabetic ZFR in order to determine whether niacin-bound chromium (NBC) and Fraction SX of maitake mushroom can affect certain aspects of the metabolic syndrome. Three groups of 8 ZFR were gavaged daily with different solutions.   For the initial 3 weeks, the control group of ZFR received only water, the second group received NBC 40 mcg, and the third group received the SX 100 mg.  During weeks 4-6, the doses of each treatment were doubled.  Losses of body weight totaled almost 50 grams per rat in controls over the full 6 weeks.  In contrast, 8 ZFR receiving NBC averaged a loss of only 9 grams per rat.  The overall loss per rat in those consuming SX averaged 16 grams.  75 percent of ZFR in the control group lost more than 50 grams over the 6 weeks whereas; no ZFR receiving NBC (0%) and 25% in the SX group lost more than 50 g over the 6 weeks of study.  ZFR in all 3 treatment groups showed significantly lower BP when compared to control that seemed to be dose related.  The general trend was for renal and liver blood parameters, hepatic and renal lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation to improve with the consumption of the natural products consumed. We conclude that fraction SX of Maitake mushroom may be useful to treat the manifestations of insulin resistance alone or combined with other natural products such as bitter melon and NBC.

 

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify the link between insulin resistance and chronic disorders of aging.
  2. Identify a safer means to prevent or slow down erosion of insulin sensitivity.
  3. Describe the effects of maitake mushroom extracts and other natural products on insulin-resistance, aging, and age-related disorders.

 

 

Applications of Martial Art-Based Therapy in Disease Management: Historical and Current perspectives”

 

Presenter:                              Patrick B. Massey, M.D., Ph.D.

                                                Medical Director

                                                Complementary and Alternative Medicine

                                                Alexian Brothers Hospital Network

 

Date:                            Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                9:15 am to 10:15 am

Room:                                Executive Salon 2

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

                Martial arts and medicine have been intertwined for over 4,000 years.  Many martial art forms were initially developed to treat and prevent illness.  Martial art movements are possibly the most commonly used form of prevention worldwide.

                Medical studies, for over a decade, have demonstrated that the practice of specific martial arts can have significant health benefits, especially in the elderly.  The practice of Tia Chi improves balance and cardiac function, especially in those patients who are unable to participate in active physical activities.

                Recent studies have shown the martial art-based therapy can help in the management of chronic pain.  Both pain and joint function associated with osteoarthritits improve with martial art-based therapy.  Therapy resistant, chronic back and neck pain can also be improved with physical therapy enhanced with specific martial art exercises.

                The history of martial arts and health as well as current medical studies will be reviewed.  One specific medical and physical therapy program (ALT-MED), incorporating martial art movements will be described.  Data on the effect of martial art movements and breathing forms on pain levels, lung capacity, stress levels, blood pressure will be examined.  Specific breathing forms and simple martial art exercise will be demonstrated with audience participation encouraged.


At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify that Martial art-based therapy is a rich source of physical movement.
  2. Identify the effects that Martial art-based therapy can have on the healing process.
  3. Explain how martial art-based therapy can help manage chronic pain, arthritis, and stress.

 

 

Herbs and Supplements for Cardiovascular Health”

 

Presenter:                                              Cathy L. Bartels, Pharm.D., FAAIM

                                                                Associate Professor and Director of Drug Information Service

                                                School of Pharmacy and Allied Health Services

                                                                University of Montana-Missoula

 

Date:                                Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                9:15 am to 10:15 am

Room:                                Executive Salon 4

Level:                                                     All levels

Fee:                                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                                              1.0 hour

CE Approval:                                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN

Target Audience:                                 Healthcare providers

 

Over half of all patients seen in the typical family medicine practice will have elevated cholesterol, putting them at risk for the development of hypertension, coronary artery disease, and stroke.  Patients often consider using herbal and dietary supplements to lower their serum cholesterol and thus prevent or delay the progression of atherosclerosis.  Recent surveys indicate widespread use of herbal and related remedies for promotion of wellness and cure or palliation of diseases by American consumers.  The widely quoted 1990 survey by Eisenberg et al., reported that three percent of adult respondents had used herbal medicine in the past year.  A follow-up survey by the same group in 1997 found that over 12 percent of adult respondents reported using herbal supplements in the past year.  With the increasing use of these supplements, it is important for health care practitioners to become familiar with the data indicating whether these products are safe and efficacious.

The primary goal of this presentation is to provide health care practitioners with a review of both the scientific literature and the best anecdotal evidence for the use of several of the popular herbal and non-herbal supplements commonly used to lower serum cholesterol.  The presentation will cover their indications, pharmacology, scientific research, adverse effects, drug interactions, dosing, and suggestions for general patient counseling.  The following supplements and therapies will be discussed:  B vitamins, chitin and chitosan, coenzyme Q10, dietary fiber and oats, garlic, gugulipid, hawthorn, omega-3 fatty acids, red yeast, soy, and vitamin E and antioxidants.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Outline the doses, therapeutic uses, contraindications, side effects, and clinically significant drug-supplement interactions of several of the commonly used herbal and non-herbal dietary supplements for the prevention of atherosclerosis.
  2. Review the clinical evidence for these therapies as they apply to individuals with hypercholesterolemia.
  3. Describe how these therapies may be beneficial or harmful to patients with elevated cholesterol.
  4. Compare and contrast similarities and differences of five popular dietary supplements for the prevention of atherosclerosis.
  5. Discuss appropriate strategies to advise patients who seek or use these therapies.

 

 

 

 

Stillness and Motion:  The Investigation of the Ancient Disciplines of Yoga and Qigong and Their Use in Rehabilitation and Healing”

 

Presenter:                              Stephen E. Driscoll, DDS, NMD, FAAIM

Co-founder / Coordinator of Tufts Orofacial Pain Study Club

                                Assistant Professor, Dept. of General Dentistry, Craniofacial Pain Center, TUSDM

                                Chairman of Admissions Committee, Capital University of Integrative Medicine                                              

 

Date:                                Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                10:30 am to noon

Room                                Executive Salon 2

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.5 hour

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS, AGD

Target Audience:                 Open

 

For centuries in the East, Yoga and Qigong or Tai Chi have been used as part of sophisticated indigenous healing systems unknown to Western Medicine. With the introduction of these systems to the West by seekers of alternative health and life strategies, there is now an ever-increasing interest by professionals driven by the lay population for scientific investigation into (1) efficacy and (2) utility for patients.

METHODS; Through examination of literature, investigation of the integration of these movement/stillness techniques in such diverse venues as stress reduction, mind/body healing, cardiac rehabilitation, arthritis treatment, cancer recovery programs, structural rehabilitation, pain management, depression and anxiety and a host of other chronic disorders that now plague many western populations.

GOALS: The discovery of regular, repeatable patterns of these mind/body modalities that can and have been investigated in the clinical setting of this and others countries to illuminate the vast body of scientific data being gathered in order to verify what the “rishis” and “masters” of centuries ago discovered experientially. Each posture or pattern has a valid, demonstrable scientific purpose for its prescription.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand and integrate material into their practice.
  2. Determine what, when, and where materials are best utilized.
  3. Identify physical/psychological effects.

 

 

Foundational Integrative Medicine for Mercury Toxicity: Patient Preparation for Auto Detoxification”

 

Presenter:                              Philip Mollica, M.S., D.M.D., N.M.D.

                                                Section Chief of Orofacial Pain, Hackensack University Medical Center

                                                Professor of Integrative Medicine, Senior Vice-President of Administrative Affairs

                                                Capital University of Integrative Medicine, Washington DC

                                                Private practice, Integrative Biologic Dentistry

 

Date:                                Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                10:30 am to noon

Room:                                Executive Salon 4

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.5 hour

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, AGD

Target Audience:                 Open

 

                Mercury being the most toxic non-radioactive substance on earth has created major health concerns within the medical as well as the public community.  A heavy metal of this nature that our society is readily exposed to poses an ever-present danger.  We must be cognizant of the fact that heavy metals of any form especially mercury is unavoidable.  How can health care providers create an ecologic environment within the human system that is conducive to heavy metal elimination?  Elemental mercury accumulates in the lungs, fatty tissues, nervous system, gut, and kidneys.  The results being organ dysfunction and ultimately a disease state.  The human body has the capacity for auto detoxification, given the proper circumstance and nutrients.  Foundational integrative medical protocols, which address fundamental biologic functions within the human ecosystem, will address fundamental biologic functions within the human ecosystem; and will encourage the mobilization and elimination of biocides such as elemental mercury.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the fundamental toxic properties of mercury. 
  2. Review the path physiology of heavy metal toxicity.
  3. Describe different protocols that encourage auto detoxification.
  4. Describe the role of the dysbiosis of the gut in heavy metal re-uptake in the human system.

 

 

 

 

Non-Traditional Medical Approach in the Management and Treatment of Breast Cancer”

 

Presenter:                              Rashid A. Buttar, D.O. FAAPM, FACAM, FAAIM

                                                Director of Clinical Research and Development, V-SAB Medical Laboratories

                                                Medical Director, Advanced Concepts in Medicine

                                                Visiting Scientist, North Carolina State University

Date:                                Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                1:30 pm to 2:30 pm

Room:                                Executive Salon 2

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

This lecture will review various cancer treatment modalities utilizing conventional as well as non-traditional medical interventions in the diagnosis, treatment and management of cancer with special emphasis using breast cancer as an example.  Common characteristics of all cancers along with the etiology of cancer will be thoroughly reviewed.  A case will be made for prevention as being the most effective “treatment” for cancer.  The role of heavy metal toxicities and persistent organic pollutants will be discussed with special emphasis on the unrecognized prevalence of these ignored issues that must be addressed if a cure for cancer is to ever become a reality.  Earlier detection methods specific for breast cancer including physiological assessments as well as biological markers will be reviewed.  Inadequacy of current detection methods will also be shown as a problem that needs to be addressed.  Assessment of intracellular and plasma nutritional level deficiencies will be discussed using breast cancer patients as examples.  The importance of monitoring functional biological markers, eliminating toxicities, improving nutritional parameters and systemic optimization of cancer patients will be shown as a necessity rather than an option.

Finally, future innovative treatment modalities used to treat the common characteristics of cancer will be presented with actual patient case studies reviewing the significant clinical changes achieved by reducing uncontrolled cellular proliferation, changing the suppression of apoptosis, manipulating cell cycles and increasing lymphocyte subpopulations.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Review conventional and non-traditional treatment modalities for cancer.
  2. Understand the common characteristics of virtually all cancers.
  3. Learn about the occurrence of a disruption in nutritional status and toxic body burden, creating a significant imbalance eventually leading to oncogenesis.
  4. Review the above components specifically in the case of breast cancer.
  5. Learn the importance of systemic optimization of the cancer patient and monitoring biological markers to assess efficacy of treatment.
  6. Present actual patient case studies, which demonstrate the future of cancer therapy.

 

 

Nutritional Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury”

 

Presenter:                              Michael T. Haneline, D.C., FICR

                                               

 

Date:                                Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                1:30 pm to 2:30 pm

Room:                                Executive Salon 4

Level:                                     Intermediate         

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              1.0 hour

CE Approvals:                      RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

The severity of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) may not be readily apparent, so patients who have sustained mild head injury should be monitored frequently during the first two-weeks of care. Brain injuries occurring during the recovery phase of prior injuries can be injurious to a magnitude greater than what would otherwise be expected. As is routinely practiced in sports medicine [1], MTBI patients should be counseled regarding the negative effects that a secondary injury to the brain could cause, and advised to avoid unsafe activities. A proportion of these patients will require joint management with a neuropsychologist or neurologist.

MTBI increases induced oxidative stress levels within the brain, creating reactive oxygen species (ROS), a major cause of secondary brain injury following head trauma. Furthermore, ascorbic acid is mobilized from brain cells to the extracellular space, necessitating supplementation. Antioxidants protect the tissue against the oxidative damage caused by ROS [2]. Ginko biloba possesses antioxidant and free radical-scavenging activities that protect against ischemic neuronal death, and counteracts the cognitive deficits that follow stress or MTBI [3].

Specific nutritional supplements may be crucial in MTBI patients, especially during the first few days post-trauma. Vitamins, minerals, trace elements, and essential amino acids are necessary to enhance the recovery from MTBI. Zinc, for instance, has been shown to improve neurologic recovery in severe brain injury patients [4]. Zinc deficiency has been shown to significantly alter the brain’s normal response, reducing the body’s capability for repair [5]. Based on the neurodegenerative cascade seen following brain injury, which involves lipid peroxidation and free radical oxidative destruction, the use of antioxidant therapy is essential [6]. This regimen includes vitamins E and C, ß-carotene, manganese, selenium, bioflavinoids, ginko biloba, and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Patients should also be counseled to eliminate all glutamate-containing products in their diets and temporarily reduce calcium intake.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand the definition of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI).
  2. Understand mechanism of injury.
  3. Understand the nutritional management of MTBI.
  4. Understand alternate management strategies.

 

 

The Organizational Impact of an Integrative Medical Program: The Hartford Hospital Experience”

 

Presenter:                              Amalia (Molly) Punzo, M.D., DHt

                                                Director of Integrative Medicine Department

                                                Director of Outpatient Center for Integrative Medicine and Pain Management

                                                Hartford Hospital, Hartford CT

 

Date:                                Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                1:30 pm to 5:00 pm, with a 30 minute break

Room:                                Texas Ballroom C

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              3.0 hours

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS, AGD

Target Audience:                 Open     

 

                The experience at Hartford Hospital has been truly exceptional and rewarding when it comes to having started and implementing an inpatient Integrative Medicine program for our patients, staff, and families.  This program began as a “pilot” over three years ago, and has been expanded at a rate beyond what any of the administrators would have imagined.  This expansion coincidentally came at time when the hospital was undergoing “reengineering,” with jobs and entire departments being cut.  How was this was possible?

The experience at Hartford Hospital in Integrative Medicine was and is possible because of a number of essential components, both in personnel, planning, and “fortuitous” occurrences.  From the first day that it began offering services (therapeutic massage, Reiki, guided imagery, art for healing, music, and acupuncture), results were “measured” as clinical patient outcomes. The outcomes that were initially measured were very basic: reductions in pain and anxiety.  Methodically this data was collected on each and every patient serviced and graphed the data for hospital physicians, nurses, and administrators to see. The data was so consistent and impressive; it was difficult for anyone in a position of influence to ignore.  These data combined with the frequent personal letters written to the department and administrators have made the program in Integrative Medicine an integral and important part of the hospital infrastructure, against the odds, and in a climate where cost containment is the necessary rule.

The approach and data will be presented and participants will be coached in successfully “integrating” Integrative Medicine within their institutions. The purpose of both this lecture and our workshop will be to inspire and inform those conference attendees who are searching for maps of this territory in which to navigate their own Integrative Medicine programs. 

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1.        Learn some of the basic successful guidelines and practices of starting and implementing a successful institutional Integrative Medicine program.

2.        Develop a working plan unique to his or her institution using the guidelines discussed above.

3.        View sample readiness assessment surveys to medical and nursing staff with the intention of developing this in their institution.

4.        Understand the importance of and “how to” of measuring clinical outcomes.

5.        Brainstorm possible funding/reimbursement sources.

 

 

Are Natural / Alternative Medicines Safe in Children?”

 

Presenter:                              James R. Hanley, M.D., FAAP

                                                Middle TN Child Care Clinic

                                                Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

                                                Attending Physician in Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital

 

Date:                                Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Room:                                Executive Salon 2

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              2.0 hours

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN

Target Audience:                 Health Care Providers (Traditional and Alternative)

 

With the increasing use of Alternative and Natural Medicines to treat acute and chronic disorders in children, the risk of adverse interactions is increasing. Complimentary Medicines may potentiate, nullify or otherwise modify the actions and serum drug levels attained with concurrently used Pharmaceuticals. An additional concern, with the renewed emphasis on Breastfeeding, is the amount of Herbal or other Supplements –either entirely or metabolites-that is available in Breast Milk, and its’ potential effect on the nursing infant.

Consideration will be given to some of the more commonly used Herbals / Supplements and Natural Remedies for Upper Respiratory Infection, Behavioral Disorders and Gastrointestinal Maladies. Interactions with commonly used Allopathic Medications for common Pediatric problems such as Reactive Airway Disease, Seizure Disorder, Migraines and Cardiovascular Disorders will be examined. Discussion will also include commonly used Herbs and supplements by potentially nursing mothers, with respect to possible adverse, and beneficial, effects of passage of these substances and/or active metabolites into the Breast Milk.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Discuss potential interactions with Antiepileptic Drugs by Vitamins A, D, K; Valerian, Eucalyptol and Ginko as well as others.
  2. Discuss potential interactions of Zinc and other supplements with commonly used HIV Therapeutic Agents.
  3. Understand the lack of evidence base for various herbal colic remedies and potential adverse effects.
  4. Understand the various Drug / Herb-Supplement interactions in commonly used medications for childhood Behavioral Disorders including ADD/ADHD and Depression or Bipolar Disorder.
  5. Understand potential risks and benefits to Breast Feeding Infants created by use of common Herbs and Supplements by Nursing Mothers.
  6. Assess the Potential interactions of Commonly used Pediatric Cardiovascular Medications such as Digoxin, Beta Blockers, Lasix, Spironolactone, Sotolol, and Calcium Channel Blockers with various Herbs / Supplements directly or via breast milk.
  7. Become aware of potential for toxic exposures in children related to Herbal Preparations and Supplements in the home.

 

 

 

Non-Invasive 6-Minute Screening of Pre-Alzheimer’s Disease of Estimating Amounts of Acetycholine, b-Amyloid (1-42), Al & Hg, Chlamydia Trachomatis and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis in the Brain, and the Safe & Effective Treatment of Pre-Alzheimer’s Disease Using the “Selective Drug Uptake Enhancement Method”

 

Presenter:                              Yoshiaki Omura, M.D., Sc.D., FACA, FICAE, FAAIM, FRSM

                                                Director of Medical Research, Heart Disease Research Foundation

                                                President, Int’l College of Acupuncture & Electrotherapeutics

                                                President, International Bi-Digital o-Ring Test Medical Society

                                                Adjunct Prof., Department of Community & Prevention Medicine, New York Medical College

                                                Prof., Department of Non-Orthodox Medicine, Ukrainian National Kiev Medical University

 

Date:                                       Saturday, August 23, 2003

Time:                                      3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Room:                                     Executive Salon 4

Level:                                     All Levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              2.0 hours

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

In pre-Alzheimer’s and Alzheimer’s disease it is well known that among characteristic abnormal findings in the brain, the following factors are included: 1)Marked decrease in Acetylcholine, 2) Excessive deposit of Al, 3) Excessive deposit of  b-Amyloid (1-42).  Using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test Resonance Phenomena Between 2 identical substances, since 1990 it has been possible to non-invasively study abnormal changes in Neurotransmitters such as Acetylcholine, Serotonin, Dopamine, as well as b -Amyloids, Al, Hg, and Pb, as well as bacteria and viruses.  Up to now, all the currently available treatment of Alzheimer’s disease are only able to slow the progression of the disease or improve symptoms but cannot reverse the normal state.  Our studies show that often infections play a very important role in pre-Alzheimer’s and Alzheimer’s disease.  The presenter found that when Chlamydia Trachomatis and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis infections in the brain, particularly the hippocampus are, are reduced significantly, a majority of patients had significant improvement in symptoms as well as reversal of short tem memory loss provided that the treatment was initiated with 1 or 2 year of onset, not after 3 or 4 years.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand quick and reliable non-invasive screening of Pre-Alzheimer’s and Alzheimer’s Disease.
  2. Understand  the localization of pathological areas of the brain.
  3. Identification of pathogenic factors, including abnormal deposits of Al, reduction in Acerylcholine, increase in b-Amyloid (1-42), and infection in the brain.
  4. Identify safe and effective treatment of each of the pathogenic factors.
  5. Make practical application of the Selective Drug Uptake Enhancement Method to deliver effective medication selectively to pathological areas.

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SUNDAY FEATURED PRESENTER – APA AND AAIM GENERAL SESSION

 

 

“Mind, Body and Spirit: Facilitating Gene Expression, Neurogenesis and Healing in Creative Living”

 

Featured Presenter:                Ernest Lawrence Rossi, Ph.D.

Ernest Lawrence Rossi, Ph.D. is an internationally renown psychotherapist, teacher and pioneer in the psychobiology of mind body healing.  In recent years he has pioneered new approaches to mindbody communication theory, healing and human consciousness.   Dr. Rossi is a Diplomate in Clinical Psychology and the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award For Outstanding Contributions to the Field of Psychotherapy by the Milton H. Erickson Foundation.   He is the Science Editor of Psychological Perspectives and the author, co-author and editor of twenty professional books in the areas of psychotherapy, dreams, psychobiology and therapeutic hypnosis that have been translated into a dozen languages.  His most recent book is The Psychobiology of Gene Expression: Neuroscience and Neurogenesis in Hypnosis and the Healing Arts.

 

Date:                                       Sunday, August 24, 2003

Time                                                       8:00am to 9:30am

                                                                30 minute break

                                                                continued 10:00am to noon

Meet the Author and Book Signing at noon

 

Room:                                     Texas Ballroom B            

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                             No additional charge

CE Credit:                              3.5 hours

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS

Target Audience:                 Open

 

Three fundamental discoveries of current neuroscience will forever change the way we understand the human mind, body, and spirit.  (1) Novelty, enriching life experiences, and physical exercise can activate neurogenesis—new growth in the brain throughout our entire lifetime.  (2) Such experiences can turn on gene expression within minutes throughout the brain and body to guide growth, the differentiation of stem cells, and healing in ways that could only be described as miraculous in the past.  (3) “Every Recall is a Reframe.”  Whenever we recall a stress or traumatically encoded memory, nature opens up the possibility for us to reconstruct it on molecular-genomic and cellular levels.

 We will explore the implications of these discoveries for an emerging worldview of how we all have an opportunity to continuously reconstruct our brain and body on all levels from mind to gene during the 4-stage creative process of daily life, psychotherapy, and spiritual practices.  We will discuss how enriching life experiences that evoke the novelty-numinosum-neurogenesis effect during creative moments of art, awe, drama, dance, humor, joy, literature, meditation, music, poetry and spiritual experience can optimize the psychosocial and cultural genomics of consciousness, personal relationships, and professional practice.

This presentation will include small group exercise of creative replay to practice in recall, replay, and re-synthesizing with creative work and spiritual practice.  The specific roles of the therapist and client in the 4-stage creative process and how to continue our learning with others and ourselves will also be discussed. 

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1.  List 3 classes of human experience that may facilitate gene expression, neurogenesis, and healing on a molecular-cellular level.

2.  List the time frames for facilitating the activity-dependent approaches gene expression, synaptogenesis, and neurogenesis in psychotherapy, the creative arts, and spiritual practice.

3.  Name the four stages of the creative process as they are manifest in daily living, psychotherapy, the creative arts, and spiritual practice.

4. Build skills in the practical application of current neuroscience concepts to psychotherapy.

 

 

 

 

 

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ALTERNATE PRESENTATIONS - APA

 

“Forbidden Grief ~ The Unspoken Pain of Abortion”

 

Presenter:                              Theresa Burke, MA, Ph.D., DAPA, NCP, LCP, DABFC

                                               

Level:                                     Intermediate

Fee                                          No additional fee

CE Credit:                              TBA (tentative 3.0 hours)

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS

Target Audience:                 Open

 

 

                This presentation will feature a trauma-sensitive perspective on how some women cope with pregnancy loss after termination of pregnancy.  Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder as they relate to abortion will be described.  Clinical examples of post-traumatic re-enactment will be provided within the framework of eating disorders, repeat pregnancies and multiple abortions, obsessive compulsive rituals and through other behavioral or physical complaints, which can be deeply rooted in this unrecognized grief.  If the caregiver has ambivalent or unresolved feelings about abortion, this may interfere with the accurate assessment of grief, the establishment of trust and the ability to be empathic.  This presentation will offer practical techniques to help you assist those grieving a pregnancy loss to begin the healing process. An overview of unique psychological and spiritual techniques will assist clients in finding closure after induced abortion.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify women at risk for psychosocial stress following induced abortion.
  2. Understand disenfranchised grief.
  3. Outline symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder as they relate to pregnancy termination.
  4. Understand the concept of traumatic re-enactment.
  5. Review current research findings of record based studies, which reveal significant psychiatric admissions following induced abortion, dramatic increased risk of suicide, alcohol and drug abuse, increased death rates due to accident and high-risk injuries.
  6. Understand therapist counter-transference issues that can inhibit client’s grief work related to loss.
  7. Identify therapeutic challenges – understand the value of bereavement group models.  Learn how to normalize symptoms to ground client in safety so that an individual can reconnect and integrate the traumatic event: tell one’s story, grieve, release buried emotions and begin to heal

 

 

 

 

“Labyrinths: Dynamic Paths For Therapeutic Growth”

 

Presenter:                              Neal Harris, LCPC, DAPA

                                                Managing Director of Relax4Life Center

                               

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              TBA (tentative 2 hours)

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS

Target Audience:                 Open

 

 

                For centuries, labyrinths have promoted group cohesion, self-awareness and spiritual growth.  Today, labyrinths are used in hospitals, schools, prisons, churches, public parks and private therapeutic settings.  Through presentation and direct experience, participants will gain a greater understanding of how labyrinths can facilitate therapeutic growth and begin to break down the barriers to effective client/therapist communication.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand the labyrinth experience; the value of combining movement with introspection.
  2. Incorporate finger labyrinths effectively into therapeutic practice to assist clients.
  3. Be awareness of how to use labyrinths for their own personal/professional growth.
  4. Recognize contra-indications for utilizing labyrinths with certain populations.

 

 

 

 

 

“The Use of Grief and Loss Counseling Across the Lifespan”

 

Presenter:                              Leslie Knetsar, M.Ed., MSW, LPC, DAPA

                                               

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credits:                            TBA (tentative 2 hours)

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS

Target Audience:                 Open

 

Grief and loss counseling is a tool that can be used at critical times in a client’s treatment process when they might otherwise appear “stuck”.  As humans proceed from birth to death, they move through endless progressions of change, both positive and negative.  Some are able to adapt to these changes, others adjust poorly, some not at all.  Most therapists have been trained to be knowledgeable about the need for grief and loss counseling at critical moments such as prior to a client’s pending death, or at a client’s loss of a loved one.  But too few therapists are aware of the havoc even positive changes can cause in our client’s lives.  A series of minor changes, even if perceived positive, grief and loss counseling will assist them to understand that positive gains in one direction often imply losses in another.  And those losses need to be recognized and grieved.

                Grief and loss counseling is utilized to assist clients to move through the life stage unique to each of them, assessing at what level they may have stalled, and determined why they may be having difficulty moving forward.  It assists them in evaluating the causes of their inability to progress by encouraging them to examine the accomplishments and losses associated with each life stage, rejoicing and grieving in their past actions, and then giving themselves permission to retain what’s of value, discarding what’s not, and then encouraging them to move on.  This abbreviated form of a life review celebrates and acknowledges both beginnings and endings.  And, as every responsible grief counselor knows, end by posing the question: Where do you want to go from here?

                Grief and loss counseling is germane to any population and can be incorporated into most therapeutic styles.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Recognize the crisis points in a client’s life when grief and loss counseling would be an appropriate intervention.
  2. Identify five basic grief and loss counseling principles that are applicable to general counseling interventions.
  3. Explain the principles behind the strategies incorporating grief and loss counseling concepts into counseling interventions.
  4. Identify at least three techniques utilizing grief and loss principles that can be incorporated into general therapeutic interventions.

 

 

 

“Clinical Utilization of Therapeutic Massage”

 

Presenter:                              Maria Kuhn, M.A., M.S., N.C.C., D.A.P.A

                                                Counselor, Private Practice

                                                Partner in Benefit Performance Associates, LLC

 

                                                Karen Curtin, R.N., B.S., C.C.N., C.D.M.S.

                                                Focus in Rehabilitation and Disability Management

 

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              TBA (tentative 2 hours)

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS

Target Audience:                 Open

 

 

                The purpose of this workshop will be to present the historical development of the use of therapeutic massage.  A review of the past research findings regarding the medical and psychological benefits of this treatment modality will also be presented.  This will be followed by a discussion of the health-related advantages of integrating the application of massage into the areas of private practice, outpatient care, and hospital settings.  This workshop will conclude with a presentation and discussion of the implementation issues regarding insurance coverage.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand the historical significance of therapeutic massage.
  2. Understand research finding regarding the benefits of massage in the treatment of physical and psychological illnesses.
  3. Obtain a framework for recommending massage in clinical settings.
  4. Identify strategies for dealing with the implementation issues of diagnosis, insurance reimbursements, credentials, and outcomes.
  5. Consider ways of incorporating this treatment modality into their clinical settings.

 

 

 

 

“Treatment Issues with Gay Male Trauma Survivors of Hate Crimes: Reconceptualizing Object Relations Theory as a Treatment Model”

 

Presenter:                              Christopher Lucies, Ed.D., LMHC, NCC, MAC, ACS, DAPA

 

Level:                                     Introductory

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              TBA (tentative 3 hours)

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS

Target Audience:                 Open

 

 

                Homosexuals continue to be one of the last groups within this society to be legally recognized with regards to civil rights and Federal protections from anti-gay violence. Due to these facts, this population often has specific treatment needs rooted in their implicit or explicit experience of anti-gay violence starting in childhood or adolescence; for some homosexual men, the anti-gay violence is ongoing and/or episodic. Frequently, homosexual men who are victims of hate crimes are apprehensive about seeking psychotherapy.  While research has shown that the relational-model of Object Relations Theory and cognitive-behavioral therapy have been used successfully with other populations of trauma survivors, there has been little research in the area of providing effective treatment to male trauma survivors of anti-gay violence. This is particularly true from the perspective of the object relation’s model.  However, Dr. Lucies’ dissertation research suggests that object relations theory could be re-defined and re-framed to support homosexual men in the process of healing after anti-gay abuse.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1.        Identify and describe the underlying sources of anti-gay sentiment and violence.

2.        Describe the development and concepts of object relation’s theory.

3.        Explore how anti-gay violence influences the developmental, the intra-psychic process and resulting symptoms for these clients.

4.        Discover how to re-define object relations concepts and re-frame them in order to better understand the experience of the homosexual.

5.        Identify several interventions and treatment planning strategies from the re-defined paradigm. 

 

 

 

 

“Spirituality: The Key to Recovery”

 

Presenter:                              Jeff Sandoz, Ph.D., L.P.C., D.A.P.A.

                                                Assistant Professor, College of Education

                                                University of Louisiana at Layfayette

                                                Columnist for Addiction & Recovery, Annals of American Psychotherapy Association

 

Level:                                     Introductory and Intermediate

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credits:                            TBA (tentative 2 hours)

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS

Target Audience:                 Open

 

 

                A relevant background history of the spiritual experience in Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is offered.  Other aspects of this presentation include the nature of alcoholism, how the instincts are involved, resentments, forgiveness, spiritual stories, anecdotes and research results.  Initially the two-fold nature of alcoholism will be reviewed including aspects of the mental obsession and the physical allergy. The philosophical concepts of the instincts from Plato will be discussed along with instinct-related desires with views of Blaise Pascal. An elaboration on AA’s 12 Step Program will be presented in conjunction with anecdotes and stories of resentments; forgiveness and Kurtz’s book The Spirituality of Imperfection. Other ideas include concepts of Freud and Jung with an elaboration on the views of William James found in The Varieties of Religious Experience. In addition, research examining the spiritual experience, as the result of the 12 Step Program in AA will be reviewed.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1.         Learn of the relevant background history of the Spiritual Experience.

2.        Comprehend the two-fold nature of alcoholism and the influence of the instincts.

3.        Understand the necessity of forgiveness in order to recovery.

4.        Review the perspectives of William James on Religious Experience.

5.        Apply aspects of the presenter’s research findings to counsel others in recovery.

 

 

 

 

 

“Empowering Pastoral Therapist using Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy”

 

Presenter:                                              J. Terry Twerell, DPC

                                                                President and Founder of the New York Christian Counseling Center

                                                                Pastor of Living Work Church in New York City and Ordained Clergy

                                                                Adjunct Professor of Pastoral Counseling, Bethel Seminary/Seminary of the East

                                                               

                                                                Janetta Astone, Ph.D.

                                                                Project Director, National Development Research Institute, Inc.

                                                                Senior Partner, New York Christian Counseling Center

                                                               

Level:                                                     All levels

Fee:                                                        No additional fee

CE Credit:                                              TBA (tentative 1-2 hours)

CE Approvals:                                      APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN, CABS

Target Audience:                                 Open

 

                The goal of this presentation is to explore the practicality of integrating Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy (REBT) with pastoral counseling and to present a REBT – pastoral model.  As practicing pastoral counselors, we are faced with the daily talks of integrating modern psychotherapy and structured biblical understanding.  The use of short-term therapies is becoming increasingly necessary with the advent of managed care and insurance fee reduction.  REBT and religion fins a mutual compatibility in the goals of the welfare of the individual, both seeking a proactive approach to change. In pastoral counseling, using REBT, the process of belief determination will focus on adherence and understanding of a body of principles as outlined in the scriptures and systematic theological interpretation.  Short-term, directional therapy tools, such as Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy, provide a systematic approach to the problems clients present and also allow for integration into a Christian philosophy.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1.        Demonstrate the compatibility of REBT within pastoral psychotherapy.

2.        Present a practical model for pastoral therapists.

3.        Provide therapists with tools to assist clients seeking a spiritual dimension.

4.        Provide practical demonstration to spiritually oriented REBT intervention.

 

ALTERNATE PRESENTATIONS – AAIM

 

“Multidisciplinary Approach to the Holistic Treatment of the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)”

 

Presenter:                              Natalia M. Vladova-Mugue, FAAIM, MSN, RN, HNC

                                               

Level:                                     Advanced

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              TBA (tentative 1.0 hour)

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

               

                Holistic Healing is known for thousands years as a variety for gentle, non-invasive, not having side effects, and cost effective procedures for treatment of people with physical, mental and emotional ailments.  This is a case study of 35-year-old female with history of several burns in 1998, resulted in multiple and extensive graft surgeries, followed by insomnia, flashbacks, panic attacks, phobias, and severe pain not responsive to opioids and tranquilizers.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. Discuss a rationale for multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of PTSD.
  2. List and define selected modalities of Holistic Healing / Complementary Medicine, as Acupressure, Reiki, Chen, Clinical Meditation, Clinical Imagery, and Nutritional Counseling.
  3. Evaluate effectiveness of the treatment from the perspective of the patient.
  4. Compare and contrast complementary (Integrative) and conventional approach.

 

 

 

 

 

“Kaya Regeneration Therapy – A Premium Spa Therapy for Rejuvenation and Regeneration”

 

Presenter:               Li-Chuan Chen, Ph.D.

                            

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              TBA

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

                Kaya Regeneration Therapy is one of many natural health modalities within the Siddha Vaidya System of Medicine. It has been practiced for thousands of years in Kerala, often referred to as the “emerald state” of South India. KRT was recently introduced to the United States by Rajkumar Reghunathan,M.D. and a Siddha Vaidya physician. It is considered to be a non-medical, health-enhancing modality which may be practiced by massage therapists, aestheticians in spa settings, holistic nurses, physicians, naturopaths and other natural health practitioners.

Kaya Regeneration Therapy involves the application of hot, herbal oil formulations to the skin using specially made pouches as applicators and a rapid stroking technique. It is suspected that this unique application process simulates burn pathophysiology and the subsequent wound healing physiology. This simulation, which does not burn the skin or cause pain, encourages regeneration of the entire body.

It appears that the whole body responds to Kaya Regeneration Therapy via four different components of the skin: (1) the vascular (blood vessel) system, promoting increased blood flow; (2) the neuronal (nerve) system, facilitating increased production of neuropeptides; (3) the soft tissue (skin cells), triggering immune response and immune modulation; and (4) the connective tissue (fibroblast stimulation), promoting the production of fresh collagen and elastic fibers.  Although unproven through clinical research in the United States, it is believed that these physiological activities may promote longevity. This has historically been one of the primary indications for the application of Kaya Regeneration Therapy in Southern India.

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

  1. List the four different components of the skin.
  2. Identify Kaya Regeneration Therapy and it origin.
  3. Describe Kaya Regeneration Therapy and it’s application.

 

 

 

“Changing the Stigmas of Medicine”

 

Presenter:                     Lorrie Saunders

                Medical Services Director

                Medical Financial Services of Anchorage Alaska

 

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              TBA (tentative 1-2 hours)

CE Approvals:                      APA, NBCC, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

Integrative Care in today's medical practices has created for the first time the ability to combine science with proven traditional treatment in a harmonious balance to provide optimal health care service. We are blessed with technology that allows doctors to share information with each other, providing more comprehensive care. Integrative Care now means having the ‘Best of the Best’ with both a wider assortment of treatment options, as well as using a united team of health care providers. Helping patients understand options ranging from the safest and cost effective to the most progressive and experimental is the responsibility of every health care practitioner and the media. The presenter will teach you ways to change the sometimes negative perception of the alternative and complimentary medicine option by turning misunderstandings into a positive understanding of the true value of a combined treatment approach.

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

                1. Empower your patients to make informed consumer choices.

                2. Explain your wide range of Integrative Care services.

                3. Identify methods to increase patient retention and compliance.

4. Identify methods of partnering with the media in your hometown to change the stigma of alternative and complimentary medicine.

 

 

 

 

“Payment for Integrative Care in Your Practice”

 

Presenter:                          Lorrie Saunders

                Medical Services Director

                Medical Financial Services of Anchorage Alaska

 

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              TBA (tentative 1-2 hours)

CE Approvals:                      RN

Target Audience:                 Open

In today's environment, medical practices are seeing a significant demand for the return of Traditional Medicine and cost-effective methodologies such as nutritional counseling. This trend has been documented in leading medical journals such as JAMA since the early 1990’s. If you are one of the "New Breed of Doctors" that wants to return to practicing the "Do No Harm Aspect" of the Hippocratic Oath then this presentation was designed with you in mind. Many physicians are now actively seeking proven administrative methods on how to successfully integrate traditional medicine (including nutrition) back into their conventional medicine practices. You and your entire medical practice team, both clinical and administrative, will learn how to work cohesively, understand what billing codes to use, and examples of charting requirements. This presentation will teach you the skills necessary to successfully integrate Traditional Medicine into your practice.

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

                1. Incorporate Integrative Care into your conventional medicine practice.

                2. Satisfy your patients’ demands for integrated treatment.

                3. Increase patient retention and compliance.

                4. Utilize ways of improving patient confidence, trust and respect.

5. Utilize ways to effectively work interdependently with your clinical and administration staff, patients, and other health care providers.

 

 

 

 

 

“The Role of Human Consciousness in Health and Healing – What Does the Evidence Show?”

 

Presenter:                     Robert W. Jarski, Ph.D., FAAIM

Director, Complementary Medicine and Wellness Program

Oakland University, Rochester MI

 

Level:                                     All levels

Fee:                                         No additional fee

CE Credit:                              TBA (tentative 1 hour)

CE Approval:                        APA, NBCC, ASWB, RN

Target Audience:                 Open

 

 

This is an evidence-based presentation and discussion of the role of consciousness and how it may be used for healing.  The role of consciousness in health and disease has been speculative primarily because defining consciousness has been difficult.  This presentation and discussion will provide comprehendible examples of consciousness-related phenomena described along three qualitatively distinct continua.  These models should help bridge consciousness theory with health care practice and support a paradigm shift toward an integrative perspective of health and disease.  The presenter will describe his experience at the Princeton University Academy of Consciousness Studies which examined new data on consciousness.  Studies using simple mechanical devices have shown that consciousness may affect the physical environment, although the effects are small, requiring thousands of data points to achieve statistical significance.  Because cells, tissues and organs are composed of molecules, disease processes are part of the physical environment and appear to be affected by consciousness.  Complex physiologic systems may amplify end-point effects making them more readily observable, requiring fewer data than simple devices.  Health practitioners should incorporate into practice the valuable resource of consciousness in the various forms represented in these models.  Documented cases of “spontaneous” remissions from disease may represent present-day glimpses into health care of the future. 

 

At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1. Discuss evidence-based data on how human consciousness affects the physical environment, and use this information to propose new possibilities for health and healing.

2.  Use three models to help de-mystify the role of human consciousness in medicine.

3. Identify mechanisms that help explain Dossey’s Era III Medicine.

                4.  Propose ways practitioners can use this information to favorably affect patient outcomes.